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Musical Resources
A CHILD'S BRAIN DEVELOPS FASTER WITH EXPOSURE TO MUSIC EDUCATION

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A two-year study by researchers at the Brain and Creativity Institute (BCI) at the University of Southern California shows that exposure to music and music instruction accelerates the brain development of young children in the areas responsible for language development, sound, reading skill and speech perception.

 

https://musiceducationworks.wordpress.com/2016/06/19/a-childs-brain-develops-faster-with-exposure-to-music/?fbclid=IwAR2lmC4p0aNNbHkjmhGwL9Rub3N4LjC-ZmLw9Kvd_WQ49rYiAZufHHPRKdA

The study of 6-7-year-old children began in 2012, when neuroscientists started monitoring a group of 37 children from an underprivileged neighborhood of Los Angeles. Thirteen of them received music instruction through the Youth Orchestra Los Angeles Program where they practiced up to seven hours each week.

Eleven children were enrolled in a community-based soccer program, and another 13 children were not involved in any training program at all.

The researchers compared the three groups by tracking the electrical activity in the brains, conducting behavioral testing and monitored changes using brain scans.

Music Education and Brain Development

 

Over the past two decades, music training has been associated with better than average language and mathematical skills and higher IQ, while differences between musicians and nonmusicians have been found in brain areas related to hearing and movement, among others. What is the mechanism behind such differences? One important goal of our program is to understand the effects of music training on brain development, investigated in terms of psychological (emotional, cognitive, social) and actual neural functions.

The only way to correctly assess the effects of music training on child development is to study children before they start any music training and to follow them systematically thereafter, to establish how their brain and behavior change in relation to their training. Beginning in 2012, in collaboration with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and their youth orchestra program (YOLA) and Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA), we have been investigating the effects of group-based music training in 80 children between the ages of six and seven. We have continued to follow them, to document the effects of such training on their development, using neural, emotional, cognitive, and social development measures.

The study is currently in its fourth year and has so far provided support for the positive impact of music training on development of auditory processes as evidenced by greater ability for pitch perception and production and enhanced maturation of the auditory pathway as shown by more developed sensory auditory evoked potentials. In addition, the findings have provided support for a positive association between music training and improvements in cognitive skills including working memory and inhibitory function and as evidence by greater brain activation in brain’s prefrontal circuitry during tasks engaging executive function skills.

We hope that the findings from this study will not only lead to a better understanding of the benefits of musical training in general but provide further insights into the social and psychological merits of childhood music education.

The BCI Brain and Music Program is supported not only by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, but by a generous grant from GRoW@Annenberg.

The only way to correctly assess the effects of music training on child development is to study children before they start any music training and to follow them systematically thereafter, to establish how their brain and behavior change in relation to their training. Beginning in 2012, in collaboration with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and their youth orchestra program (YOLA) and Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA), we have been investigating the effects of group-based music training in 80 children between the ages of six and seven. We have continued to follow them, to document the effects of such training on their development, using neural, emotional, cognitive, and social development measures.

The study is currently in its fourth year and has so far provided support for the positive impact of music training on development of auditory processes as evidenced by greater ability for pitch perception and production and enhanced maturation of the auditory pathway as shown by more developed sensory auditory evoked potentials. In addition, the findings have provided support for a positive association between music training and improvements in cognitive skills including working memory and inhibitory function and as evidence by greater brain activation in brain’s prefrontal circuitry during tasks engaging executive function skills.

8 Healing Benefits of Music

The healing power of music.

Whether it's the perfect song after a bad break-up, or something relaxing to listen to while you study, there are endless ways that music makes our hearts and souls feel better. But research shows that music can have benefits for our bodies, too.

 

1.  Eases Anxiety

2.  Reduces Stress

3.  Helps During Surgery

4.  Helps Sound Processing Ability

5.  Boosts Heart Health

6.  Soothes Pain

7.  Helps Memory

8.  Protects the Aging Brain


The Mayo Clinic points out that music can have effects ranging from reducing feelings of physical pain to boosting memory. So whether you're a fan of Vivaldi, Explosions in the Sky or Carrie Underwood -- or all three! -- be sure to check out our round-up of the health benefits of both playing and listening to music below. And tell us in the comments: How does music help you?   http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/09/music-and-health-11-ways-body-mind_n_1413241.html

Music, Architecture and Life...

One of the biggest joys of owning a music store is the interesting people we get to talk to every day.  Almost every customer and shopper wants to hang out a bit and tell us their story of which we are always very interested.  This last week at the Colorado Music Educators Conference, we talked to hundreds of musicians, mostly music educators.  There was one father who stood out.  His son was the teacher, but he told us his story and journey in his career as an architect but his love and passion for music.  I was so touched by his story, I asked if we could video tape it for you to hear it from him.  Please CHECK IT OUT  

 

 

Music Training Can Improve Decision-Making, Focus and Impulse Management
Another study on the benefits of music...  We understand more and more the health of our brain through modern technological scanning.  The breaking of synapses and disease causing problems and the health of positive stimulation from healthy activities - i.e. MUSIC!!!  Here they looked at 80 six and seven year olds and found 

According to the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California, as little as two years of music instruction can change the structure of parts of the brain which carry signals and process information, and boost networks which support decision-making, attention, and impulse inhibition.  Two new studies from the Institute show that within two years, music training can change both the structure of the brain’s white matter, which carries signals through the brain, and grey matter, which contains most of the brain’s neurons that are active in processing information. Music instruction also boosts engagement of brain networks that are responsible for decision-making and the ability to focus attention and inhibit impulses.

“Together these results demonstrate that community music programs can offset some of the negative consequences that low socioeconomic status can have on child development,” said Dr. Assal Habibi, the lead author and an assistant research professor of psychology.

“We have documented longitudinal changes in the brains of the children receiving music instruction that are distinct from the typical brain changes that children that age would develop,” Dr. Habibi added. “Our findings suggest that musical training is a powerful intervention that could help children mature emotionally and intellectually.”

https://ecs.page.link/PZWp

Snowstorms this Winter - Debussy's The Snow Is Dancing
So much snow lately... Debussy wrote a children's piece for piano The Snow is Dancing: here's an excerpt. Many orchestras play this. Physicists say the sound of snow is not audible for the human ear. If it was, do you think it would sound like this? Debussy wrote the Children's Corner, a suite of pieces including this one, for his daughter in 1908.
What Is Music?

Golden Music staff works everyday with musicians and families and friends of musicians, we often think about the nature of music.  What's it's purpose, what is it exactly?

A very interesting article came across my desk today*.  

Flutes were discovered made from bone found in Germanymusic, the earliest recorded instruments placed at about 200,000 years old, meaning our species as we are developed today were music makers.  What was music's role in our ancestors' lives?  What is it in our lives, in our community?

Music establishes COMMUNITY.

A mother humming to her child (probably came before language), ancestral men dancing and singing before a hunt.  Researchers state “By establishing such a bond between individuals, music created not only the family, but society itself...  Our Ancestors' lives depended on the hunt and used music in the ceremonies. It paved the way for us to communicate with each other and to share emotions."

As centuries went by, Music's ability to communicate emotions was precisely what made it persist after the development of language.  On top of that, there is an instinctive function of music--to make us feel good.  Songs activate the frontal lobe, produce dopamine and act on the cerebellum, which is able to “synchronize itself” to the rhythm of the music, which causes pleasure. “It’s like a toy for the brain,” that also stimulates creativity.  For years, we've been quoting the influence of music study on the develop of children, that's old news.

What's so interesting is this research that music is about bonding and communication.  We strive to create music community thrives on the bonds we develop.  We have four community groups right now as well as our private lesson program, where wonderful music mentors work with developing musicians.  I would also say that we strive to bond with you when you come to our store, as we discuss your music needs and dreams.  

Golden Music supports your music connections!

All data for this blog came from:  https://www.bbvaopenmind.com/en/what-is-the-purpose-of-music/  Joana Oliviera

 

Fibonacci Series and Strad

 

The Fibonaccie Series - the "golden" series is ascribed to have regulated the whole exterior shape of the violin prior to the use of molds. For generations, violins created by the master luthier Stradivarius are known for their tone quality and their aesthetic form. Below left is a design of a scroll with the elegant curve of the series. The Golden Ratio \phi = \frac{1+\sqrt{5}}{2} = 1.61803 can be found throughout the violin by dividing lengths of specific parts of the violin:

Amazing Collections of Music Soul Posts

Music and Its Effect on Body, Brain/Mind, and Spirit
A brief look at history
• Some archaeologists believe that music and dancing preceded language.
• Since the days of the Greeks and Romans, music has had a profound effect on the body and the mind.
• Healing and sound were considered sacred science. 
• Healing and music diverged in the 18th century, music was for entertainment, healing was practiced through science and medicine.
• Since World War II, the health benefits of music have become more recognized in mainstream medicine.
• Today, no human culture is known that does not have music. 

Music affects the body and the brain
Music for Mind and Body (article) http://valleymusictherapy.com/research.html
Tuning the Brain for Music (article)  http://www.braintuning.fi/research.html
Music and the Human Brain (article)  http://www.silcom.com/~aludwig/Brain.htm
Music for Pain (Article and Video)  http://www.sciencentral.com/articles/view.php3?article_id=218392834
The Healing Power of Music (article) http://www.myoptumhealth.com/portal/Information/item/
Music+Therapy%3A+Benefits+and+Uses?archiveChannel=Home%2FArticle&clicked=true
Can Music Therapy Affect your Health? (article)
http://www.scientificblogging.com/erin039s_spin/can_music_therapy_affect_your_health 
“Music medicine” has only begun to receive serious scientific consideration, with rigorous medical research beginning to build up in the late 1980s.
“Music Neuroscience, Physiology and Medicine.” Fall 1997. Musica(IV)2. (article) http://www.musica.uci.edu/mrn/V4I2F97.html#neuroscience
Music as Medicine (article) http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2002286998_healthmusic25.html


Music Medicine
Physical effects of music
• Changes in blood flow
• Speed of muscle reaction
• Lower blood pressure
• Lower heart rate
• Changes in cell structure
• Stimulation of chemicals in the brain

Music and its Effect on the Brain (links and websites) http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=music+and+its+eff
ects+on+the+brain&start=10&sa=N 


Music and its Impact on the Human Brain (article)
http://stanford.wellsphere.com/general-medicinearticle/doctor-blog-music-and-it-s-impact-on-the-humanbrain/18975

Music and the brain
Psychological effects of music
• Calms the body and the mind
• Facilitates visualization
• Diverts attention away from unpleasant situations.
• Entrainment enables individuals to experience commonality with feelings conveyed in music.


Music’s effect on the brain
• The cerebellum is connected to the ears. Music produces emotional responses and positively impacts movement.
• Watching musicians perform affects brain chemistry differently than listening to a recording.
• Music triggers reward centers in the brain, the same neural clusters that process pleasure also fire up for music.
• Brain neurons are hard-wired for music.
• Processing music is complex and not limited to the right hemisphere only.
• There is a strong connection between memory centers of the brain and those that process music

• Music is transported via the auditory nerve to the auditory cortex.

• The right side of the cortex perceives pitch, melody, harmony, and timbre.
• The left side of the cortex processes changes in frequency and intensity.
• Both sides are needed for rhythm, as in differentiating time signatures.
• The hippocampus differentiates between styles of music.
• Frontal cortex perceives other aspects of melody and rhythm; patterns of neural activity are seen that are affected by music.
• Research has shown that activity in regions of the brain, in addition to the cerebral cortex, are heightened while listening to music.
• The limbic system of the brain evokes a feeling from a certain piece of music .
• The rhythm of a song makes people want to tap out a rhythm, or dance, which is controlled by the brain’s motor functions.  
• The experience of a live music performance is perceived and responded to by the brain even more strongly than recorded music.


Music’s effect on the brain
Psychoacoustics is:
• The study of how humans perceive sound.

How we listen
Psychological responses to music
Physiological impacts on human nervous system
• In the spectrum of sound, there is a chain of vibration.
All atomic matter vibrates.
 Frequency is the speed at which matter vibrates.
The frequency of vibration creates sound (sometimes inaudible to
human ears).
Sounds can be molded into music.

Psychoacoustics
http://www.sound-remedies.com/psyc.html

Spiritual effects of music
• Music creates a point of focus for the mind.
• Music aligns energy fields, when coupled with intention,
vibration and resonance flow.
• Music allows access to inner resources:
• Renewed vitality
• Balance
• Clarity
• Inspiration
• Relaxation
• Creativity
• Transformation
In conclusion
• The brain is the CPU for all human thoughts and actions;
only now are we beginning to understand how it
orchestrates the symphony of music and its effects.
• The brain synthesizes music unlike any other “input” and
uses all of its parts to create pleasure or pain from the
sounds and frequencies we hear.
• From cancer to Alzheimer’s, to mentally handicapped, to
spiritually broken, as well as many other conditions, music
flows into the brain and aids in the healing of body, mind
and soul.
References

“The Importance of Music and Brain Research.”
http://www.centerformusicmedicine.org/pdfs-music-andbrain/THE_IMPORTANCE_OF_MUSIC_AND_BRAIN_RES
EARCH.pdf
• “The Role of Music and Sound in Healing from Cancer:
Developing Your Own Sound Healing Practice.”
www.healingmusic.org
• Sancar, Feyza “Music and the Brain: Processing and
Responding.”
http://www.centerformusicmedicine.org/pdfs-music-andbrain/Music_and_Brain-Sancar.pdf

This article is from:  http://www.musicforhealthservices.com/Music_as_therapy/Pages/Module%2007_Creative_Applications_of_Music_and%20_Sound/7.2_Music_and_its_effect_on_Body_Brain_and_spirit.pdf

Where Golden Music's New Logo Comes From... the "Golden Ratio"

In search of the golden ratio...in Music... in architecture

In the quest for beauty, one of the most immutable traditions – and controversial fascinations – in Western architecture (and furniture and art and music and mathematics) is the golden section, a proportioning system first described by ancient Greek mathematicians such as Euclid and Pythagoras, but also observable in nature.

Modernist architect Le Corbusier defined it as the height of a typical man divided by the height of his belly button, and used the relationship to create what he considered “humane” buildings – structures that better reflected the human form.

And even if the equation to derive the ratio – (a+b)/a = a/b = 1.618 – is, well, Greek to most of us, the manifestations – what it looks like – shouldn’t be. It shows up constantly: It’s the aesthetically pleasing shape of a standard credit card (the ultimate golden rectangle, as it were); Aston Martin uses it to proportion its expensive (yet undeniably sexy) sports cars. It was used by painters such as Da Vinci, Dali and Mondrian to compose their masterpieces, and it’s often ascribed to the front facade of the Parthenon (although some academics say there is no proof that it was done so consciously).

As further evidence of its ubiquity, in 2010, Singaporean industrial designer Olivia Lee released a sketchpad with grid lines based on the proportion. She then used the pad to sketch out famous buildings and products that were influenced by the ratio, including a Chanel clutch, a Philippe Starck lemon juicer, the famous Verner Panton chair and a building by architect Rem Koolhaas (Beijing’s CCTV headquarters, which looks a bit like a jagged bagel).

This last example is part of the reason the ratio is particularly special: It’s among the few aesthetic traditions that has lasted more-or-less continuously throughout the history of Western architecture. While no one seems too keen on building pyramids or Baroque cathedrals any more, a structure that has windows or rooms sized according to the golden ratio is not uncommon. And it happens as much in large public buildings – famed American architect Steven Holl is a proponent, having recently finished an addition to the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland based around the golden section – as in homes.

There is scientific evidence to suggest that the appeal of the proportion is, in fact, natural. In 2009, Adrian Bejan, a professor of mechanical engineering at Duke University, in North Carolina, completed a study on the proportion. He found that things shaped according to the golden ratio – be it a paragraph of text or a painted canvas – were the easiest for a human’s eyes and brain to perceive and understand. Because the shape helps with quick cognition, and because humans appreciate being helped, it makes us feel good, so “we feel pleasure and we call it beauty,” Bejan told The Guardian in 2009.

But he also notes: “I understand the golden section as a tool. Someone with no talent will never produce something good by using it. To make poetry, you have to know more than grammar, but you have to know grammar nonetheless.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/home-and-garden/architecture/in-search-of-the-golden-ratio-in-architecture/article20040240/?cmpid=rss1

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